Tested: Qstarz LT-Q6000 GPS Lap Timer

Tested: Qstarz LT-Q6000 GPS Lap Timer

by Clint Boisdeau

Proper technique, experience, and seat time are usually what gets you faster around a road course.  But once a certain level is reached, finding time and consistency takes more then just instinct and a lap time.  Lap telemetry and data acquisition used to be the dreams that race teams were made of.  Such data loggers were either out of most grassroots drivers' budgets, and/or more complicated to use than sending a man into space.  Within the last few years though, the combination of high market demand and  cost reduction in technology have made way for many different lap telemetry products that are not only affordable, but also easy to operate with high levels of available tech support.  Qstarz is one of these companies, and the LT-Q6000 is their flagship lap telemetry/data unit.

 

Weighing in at a scant 4 ounces, the unit itself is extremely light and no larger then a deck of cards.  The suction cup mount is just shy of 5 ounces, making for a total package under 9 ounces.  This is part of what makes the LT-Q6000 is such an attractive buy.

Many of the LT-Q6000's features are well thought out, and easy to use.  The 2.4 inch color display gives real time lap, split, and sector times via GPS on a 10Hz log which records at 10 times per second enhancing the accuracy of the data.  Lap sector times and total lap time are shown with either a green background signifying a faster sector or lap from your previous.  Or a red background representing a slower time.  With various display options, you can choose to show a a G-force meter and a G-force plot status as the live display.  Another display option is the Smart Speedometer which can be viewed in both mile per hour (MPH) or kilometer per hour (KPH).  Run session start can be either set for push button, on a timer, or an auto trigger start using your GPS position making it easy to use whether you're able to reach the logger to push the start button or not.  All session logs are saved to the 4GB internal memory and are filed under date and time for easy reference.  Track maps can either be saved by self mapping, synced from shared track maps on Qracing, or downloaded from the Qstarz website.  A drag race mode is also available with numerous forms of recording straight line performance  such as 0-60mph and 1/4 mile time.  Furthermore, the predictive lap timing feature helps enhance precision by finding every last bit of potential time per lap.  Video overlay allows you to add Qstarz data into your on board video footage.  Multiple language display options (English, Chinese, and Japanese) are available on the LT-Q6000 unit and even more languages on the Qracing software.  Another advantage is its wirefree setup.  With a full charge, the LT- Q6000 is good for 10 hours of operation.  Qstarz also provides free software/firmware updates, 24/7 technical support and a 1 year warranty.

 

Your product box will contain the following seen here.  The LT-Q6000 unit, suction cup mount/bracket, USB to mini USB cord, 12V DC to mini USB cord, Qracing software CD, quick start guide, LT-Q6000 protective case, and a cool sticker.  

I've been testing the LT-Q6000 on various MotoIQ project cars and time attack vehicles (Such as Project 370Z, Project Mustang GT, the Novak Racing Subaru GC and Honda Civic Type R) and have found the data from track days, vehicle testing, and competition to be invaluable.  The Qracing interface enables you to easily pin point areas on track where you have gained and/or lost time.  Another useful feature is being able to overlay different laps from seperate run sessions, and use the “play” button to show the GPS lap replay on the track map.  This feature allows you to visually see what parts of which laps were for the better, and where mistakes were made.

 

Here we have a lap telemetry example of a time attack competition hot lap in the Novak Racing Subaru GC at Willow Springs Interternational Raceway “Big Willow” course.  The Qracing interfaces allows you to pinpoint within a single mile per hour at any section of the course as well as the corresponding G force load in any direction, and the elapsed time at that specific moment.  
 
 

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