Project E46 M3: Part 12 – Whiteline control arm bushings, alignment, and tumbler switch fix

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As you can see, even though our M3 seemed to drive fine, the total toe was way off. This means a potentially negative effect in handling, braking, straightline stability, and of course tire wear. While road cours racers usually like a little toe “out” to induce a more sharp turning response, this causes a little more tire wear on the inside (also due to the high negative camber usually used) and a slight a loss in straightline stability. Street cars normally like a little less camber and more toe “in” to stabilize straightline performance and reduce tire wear. Ours is set up more street-like to encourage good tire wear. Plus, the BFG Rival tires have tread so far down the profile of the tire, which helps tremendously with cars not using big camber up front. While the rear of the car is showing a bunch of “red”, it's mainly because of the paremeters set. It's actually right where we want this car to be.
Here are the numbers for the front wheels after Amoris' corrections. It's about where we want to be to keep our BF Goodrich Rival tires happy and living a long life, while providing good cornering.
Here's a sneak peak at Amoris' RX-7 drag racer. It's seen here waiting to get finished up at Modified by KC. This sucker runs mid 7's at over 185 MPH in the quarter. (Amoris would like to thank Balancing Whiz, Pro-Jay, Wilbert Performance, E&J Apex Seals, G Force Transmission, Microtech, 1320 video, Allegro Racing, AMS 2000 NLR elecrtronics, Modified by KC, and GRS Motorsports) We'll have a full feature on the RX-7 soon!

Back to our Project E46 M3, another minor update we did was to color match our Castro Motorsports CSL-style intake manifold to the rest of our engine by spray-painting it with Black Wrinkle finish spray paint.This is what the painted fiberglass CSL box was looking like after several installations and removals over the past year. Not so pretty any more.

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