Restoring a Legend, Building a LS3 For Falken’s Championship Winning S13 – Part Two

When building a stroked motor, you must carefully check the engine for clearance. On an LS the clearance to the bottom of the bores is the close point for a stroker motor.  We believe that you should not exceed a 4″ stroke on a stock LS block because of clearance in this area and also because the piston extends too low below the bore with longer strokes.

When a longer than 4″ stroke is used, a lot of the piston skirt pokes down past the bore and the piston loses stability about bottom dead center.  This causes the piston to rock violently which leaves chatter marks in the bore and wear marks on the piston.  The bore and piston skirt wear a lot faster because of this.  There is some evidence of this happening on a 4″ stroke even but we think it is not too bad and a drift car needs the torque a longer stroke gives.

Stay tuned, in our next article about Falken’s new motor, we will be assembling the top end and teaching you more LS assembly tricks!

Sources

Eagle Rods

WPC Treatment

JE Pistons

King Bearings

Comp Cams

FAST

Canton Racing Products

Mast Motorsports

Scoggin Dickey

ARP

 

4 comments

  1. I don’t have much in the way of comments but I’m really interested to see how this turns out – from the parts selection and goals, this looks like a really really useful build spec for a lot of purposes.

    With the relatively big cam (I certainly like the idea Comp has there, if it works as expected) but highish compression, what are you anticipating for octane requirements, or are you just accepting as a given it’ll be E85/race gas fed?

    1. I think this engine will be great for drift, road race, and any long-duration type use. It will need something like E85 or a race fuel like VP110.

      1. I was thinking that with the compression tuned down a bit (or just fed E85) it might make a really fun “hot street” combination as well, at least for those of us with tolerance for some compromises on drivability.

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